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Fernand Cormon, Cain, 1880, 400 x 700 cm, Musée d'Orsay, Paris

Cormon’s Cain Flees The Curse

Fernand Cormon, Cain, 1880, 400 x 700 cm, Musée d’Orsay, Paris (image in public domain) By Patrick Hunt –  Fernand Cormon’s giant 1880 painting almost fills an entire gallery wall at the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, not...

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Antikythera Mechanism circa 1st c BCE (image in public domain)

The Antikythera Mechanism – Identifying its Place of Origin?

Antikythera Mechanism, circa late 3rd to late 2nd c BCE (image in public domain) By Douglas McElwain Antikythera Mechanism The Antikythera Mechanism was discovered in a shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera (just south of the Peloponnesus)...

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Hellenistic or Roman, probably after Lysippos (Greek, c. 365-c. 310 B.C.). Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth
(courtesy of Florence Exhibition)

It’s Raining – Bronzes ! Florence Exhibitions of Ancient Bronze 2015

Hellenistic or Roman, probably after Lysippos (Greek, c. 365-c. 310 B.C.)  Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth (courtesy of Florence Exhibition) By Andrea M. Gáldy – Two concurrent complementary exhibitions in Florence in 2015 have been...

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Battle Scene - recolored- on Trajan's Column, Rome (Image Courtesy of National Geographic Media)

War! What Is It Good For? – Book Review

Battle Scene – recolored- on Trajan’s Column, Rome (Image Courtesy of National Geographic Media) By Jack Martinez –  War! What is it Good For? Conflict and the Progress of Civilization from Primates to Robots Ian Morris Farrar,...

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Neilson Hays Library Bangkok (Photo courtesy of the library)

The Architecture of Mario Tamagno and the Neilson Hays Library in Bangkok

Neilson Hays Library Bangkok (Photo courtesy of the library) By Catherine Clover –  By its definition, the Beaux Arts movement in architecture combined the classical proportions of the Greco–Roman period with the Neo-Classical decorative...

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Fernand Cormon, Cain, 1880, 400 x 700 cm, Musée d'Orsay, Paris

Cormon’s Cain Flees The Curse

By Patrick Hunt –  Fernand Cormon’s giant 1880 painting almost fills an entire gallery wall at the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, not just because it is almost 23 feet long (7 meters) but also because its dramatic starkness directly strikes the viewer in the often-darkened room. The biblical background of Genesis 4:11-12 is alluded in Carmon’s most […]

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Antikythera Mechanism circa 1st c BCE (image in public domain)

The Antikythera Mechanism – Identifying its Place of Origin?

By Douglas McElwain Antikythera Mechanism The Antikythera Mechanism was discovered in a shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera (just south of the Peloponnesus) between 1900-02. Over a century of study by researchers has determined that it is the remains of a two thousand year old astronomical computer. It is believed that the analog device […]

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Hellenistic or Roman, probably after Lysippos (Greek, c. 365-c. 310 B.C.). Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth
(courtesy of Florence Exhibition)

It’s Raining – Bronzes ! Florence Exhibitions of Ancient Bronze 2015

By Andrea M. Gáldy – Two concurrent complementary exhibitions in Florence in 2015 have been dazzling and hugely aesthetically rewarding: Power and Pathos. Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World (Palazzo Strozzi, 14 March to 21 June 2015) and Small Great Bronzes. Greek, Roman and Etruscan Masterpieces (Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Firenze, 20 March to 21 June […]

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Battle Scene - recolored- on Trajan's Column, Rome (Image Courtesy of National Geographic Media)

War! What Is It Good For? – Book Review

By Jack Martinez –  War! What is it Good For? Conflict and the Progress of Civilization from Primates to Robots Ian Morris Farrar, Straus and Giroux (April 15, 2014) 512 pages In his recent book, War! What is it Good For?, Ian Morris writes, “War has made the planet peaceful and prosperous.” Since its release, […]

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Neilson Hays Library Bangkok (Photo courtesy of the library)

The Architecture of Mario Tamagno and the Neilson Hays Library in Bangkok

By Catherine Clover –  By its definition, the Beaux Arts movement in architecture combined the classical proportions of the Greco–Roman period with the Neo-Classical decorative elements popularized in the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Of the many buildings that fall into this category of architecture, two prominent international opera houses come to mind – the Palais […]

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Sacsayhuaman (photo courtesy of Kim McQuarrie)

Inca Metronomy – An Intersection of Cultural Elements

By Douglas McElwain – Inca measurements are systematic as they apply to architecture and quipu knot structures. This article suggests a relationship between three seemingly disparate elements of Inca culture; stone walls, distance units of measure, and quipu (surviving string knot artifacts). Walls The Inca of Peruvian South America lived in a geologically active zone […]

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Bereshit "In the beginning" opening word in Hebrew scripture or Old Testament Genesis.

Hebrew Poetry and Word Play in Genesis 1:1-2

By Patrick Hunt –  While this is not in any way comprehensive, some of my favorite word plays from Hebrew literature show a deliberate use of language for suggesting multiple ambiguities, sometimes even steganographic – hiding things in plain sight – and often paronomasic – having connections in both sound and meaning. Genesis 1:1-2 is […]

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orestes-clytemnestra

Looking Glass: Classical Psychology and Law Since Solon and Aeschylus

 Orestes Going After His Mother Clytemnestra to Kill Her, 5th c. BCE Red-Figure vase, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston By Walter Borden, M.D. Clytemnestra: “But blood of man once spilled, Once at his feet shed forth, and darkening the plain, Nor chant nor charm can call it back again. So Zeus has willed.”    Aeschylus, Agamemnon What […]

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Champagne Revelers in a scene depicting 18th century. a bas-relief form 1883 at Pommery, Reims (Image in public domain)

Champagne History: The Lasting Legacy of Bubbles

  By Catherine Clover – “Remember gentlemen, it’s not just France we are fighting for, it’s champagne!” _Winston Churchill, WWII As the year 2014 comes to a close, it is a most fitting time to reflect upon the year in review and prepare resolutions for the year ahead. After meeting Francois Hurtel, champagne specialist with […]

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Ottoman Period Ark illumination from Sultanahmed Bazaar, Istanbul (Photo P. Hunt 2014)

Review: Irving Finkel’s The Ark Before Noah

By Patrick Hunt –  The Atrahasis Flood Tablet I first saw in Irving Finkel’s office at the British Museum a few years ago before this book was published seemed much like many others in the museum galleries, a cuneiform clay tablet one could easily hold in a hand. But this one was different in several […]

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