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The Throne of Charlemagne: Carolingian Symbolism

Fig. 1 Charlemagne’s Throne , Aachen Cathedral, ca. 800 (Photo P. Hunt 2019) By Patrick Hunt – Aachen Cathedral (also known in German as the Kaiserdom) is one of the most important monuments in the Early Medieval World,...

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Naughty But Nice: The Renaissance Nude

1 Raphael, The Three Graces, c. 1517-18. Red chalk on paper, 20.3 x 25.8 cm. Royal Collection Trust © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2019 By Andrea M. Gáldy – Thomas Kren with Jill Burke and Stephen J. Campbell (eds.), The...

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Schlosshotel Kronberg – Modern Classic Fairy Tale Castle

Schlosshotel Kronberg im Taunus (Photo P. Hunt, 2019) By P. F. Sommerfeldt – When you are first driven through the park gatehouse for the Schlosshotel Kronberg nestled in the lower forested slopes of the Taunus Mountains of Germany...

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High Praise for the Better Cromwell: Review of Diarmaid MacCulloch’s Thomas Cromwell

Drawing of Thomas Cromwell, ca. 1538 by Hans Holbein the Younger By Patrick Hunt – How many books do we read that fulfill three major vital requisites: open up realms of unexplored territory, correct long-held misapprehensions,...

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The Sea is a Path

Captain James Cook and the HMS Endeavor, portrait of Nathaniel Dance-Holland, 1774 and Gregory Robinson (combined image courtesy of The Australian, 2017) By Andrea M. Gáldy – When Captain James Cook left for the first of his...

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The Throne of Charlemagne: Carolingian Symbolism

By Patrick Hunt – Aachen Cathedral (also known in German as the Kaiserdom) is one of the most important monuments in the Early Medieval World, begun circa. 796, and symbolically identified with the end of the Dark Ages when literacy was finally resurgent in the Carolingian Age. Charlemagne built Aachen’s palatine church and adjacent palace […]

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Naughty But Nice: The Renaissance Nude

By Andrea M. Gáldy – Thomas Kren with Jill Burke and Stephen J. Campbell (eds.), The Renaissance Nude, Getty Publications: Los Angeles 2018. The Renaissance Nude, The Royal Academy of the Arts, London, 3 March to 2 June 2019, organised by the J. Paul Getty Museum  and the Royal Academy of the Arts The current […]

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Schlosshotel Kronberg – Modern Classic Fairy Tale Castle

By P. F. Sommerfeldt – When you are first driven through the park gatehouse for the Schlosshotel Kronberg nestled in the lower forested slopes of the Taunus Mountains of Germany above Frankfurt and see its  grandeur of towers and steep roofs, it is fairly obvious it was originally a royal residence. Chauffeured in one of […]

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High Praise for the Better Cromwell: Review of Diarmaid MacCulloch’s Thomas Cromwell

By Patrick Hunt – How many books do we read that fulfill three major vital requisites: open up realms of unexplored territory, correct long-held misapprehensions, and unearth and carefully document sources of some of what we take for granted? When Hilary Mantel [1] states Diarmaid MacCulloch’s Thomas Cromwell (Viking, 2018) is a book awaited four […]

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The Sea is a Path

By Andrea M. Gáldy – When Captain James Cook left for the first of his three expeditions to the Pacific in 1768, he stood in a long line of naval explorers looking for new routes and continents. His ship was appropriately named Endeavour and the task ahead was daunting. Cook was a talented surveyor, as […]

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Russian Lacquerware Gems

Russian Lacquerware Gems

By P. F. Sommerfeldt – The names Palekh and Kholuy, like Fedoskino and Mstera, may be only obscure villages in the Vladimir-Suzdal Ivanovo region of Russia to many people, but their rich legacy of lacquerware is anything but obscure. I first fell in love with Russian lacquerware when we lived in London off and on […]

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“Baghdad Battery” : Possible Beer Purification?

By Adrian Arima – How long have humans brewed beer? Patrick McGovern, the world’s foremost historian of ancient brews, hints in Ancient Brews (2017) that this activity has been around possibly at least for 11,000 years based on vessels from Gobekli Tepe in Anatolia (Turkey). How sophisticated was brewing in antiquity? Since the ancient artifact […]

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Villa Monastero, Lake Como

By Alessandra Scola- Villa Monastero is one of the several monumental villas mostly built or enlarged between the 17th and 19th centuries on one of the long coasts of Lake Como (also known in antiquity as Lago Lario) the deepest Italian lake. The villa is located in Varenna, an enchanting old fishermen’s village filled with […]

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Pont-du-Gard: Why Did Roman Engineers Number the Stones?

Fig. 1   Pont du Gard side view (photo P. Hunt, 2015) By David S. Spain, Ph.D. –  One of the favorite examples of Roman aqueduct technology is the famous Pont du Gard in southern France.  The arcaded Pont du Gard is part of the 50 km long aqueduct from springs near Uzes running all […]

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We are Florentine

Fig. 1   Filippo Lippi, Portrait of a Young Man, ca 1480-5, National Gallery, Washington DC,                       Andrew Mellon Collection (image courtesy National Gallery of Art) By Andrea M. Gáldy – If it would not look so catty, temptation would be great to call the exhibition […]

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