Recent Stories

 

Imperium and Genius in the Pantheon of Rome

By Patrick Hunt –  Almost any informed list of the most famous historic buildings of the world will include the Pantheon of Rome. Its longevity since the mid-second century is important but not the most important reason why; its grandeur and size are staggering, even more so when one one enters its vast interior dome. […]

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Good Manners : Mannerism in Florence

Pontormo, Venus and Amor, 1533 By Andrea M. Gáldy – Maniera. Pontormo, Bronzino and Medici Florence, 24 Feb to 5 June 2016 at the Städel Museum, Frankfurt/Main curated by Bastian Eclercy, the department of Italian, French and Spanish paintings before 1800. Catalogue available in English and German: Bastian Eclercy, ed. Maniera. Pontormo, Bronzino and Medici […]

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Mandalay’s Royal Palace Reconstructed: Lessons in Historic Preservation

Mandalay’s Golden Palace  (Image courtesy of Oway Agency, Myanmar) By Catherine Clover –  On a recent trip to Myanmar (Burma) I made a stop in the crossroads city of Mandalay. Linking the route from the south of the country in Yangon to the states of the north, in modern times the city has acted primarily […]

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Sleeping Beauties – Is there a Future for University Collections?

By Andrea M. Gáldy –  Imagine a present-day student being so happy with the education she or he received from the alma mater that the thank you note includes a huge drinking vessel in the form of a ship and made from gilded silver. Perhaps a little over-the-top but then those were different times and […]

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A New Baron Munchausen

By P. F. Sommerfeldt –  That far-fetched frolic of the rogue librarian Raspe, Adventures of Baron Munchausen has entertained many generations of readers since 1785, including the genius Terry Gilliam who made his peerless movie version in 1988, thereby introducing its wiles to modern cinematography, although often faithful to Gustave Doré’s 19th century illustrations. Gilliam is […]

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Gardens of Pompeii as Roman Legacy

By Cher Stone Beall – Gardens are a vital part of urban Pompeii as perhaps the best known Roman city. From a distance the location of some of the gardens in Pompeii must have revealed themselves with treetops rising above walls encircling them. The gardens of Pompeii were spread throughout the ancient city, not unlike […]

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Bathsheba: Rembrandt’s Confession

  Patrick Hunt –  1  “In the spring, at the time when kings go off to war, David sent Joab out with the king’s men and the whole Israelite army. They destroyed the Ammonites and besieged Rabbah. But David remained in Jerusalem.  2  One evening David got up from his bed and walked around on […]

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Napoleon Superstar

by Andrea M. Gáldy, with Stefanie Fricke,  Sabrina Kessler, Felicitas Meifert-Menhard  War and Peace Bayerische Landesausstellung 2015  „Napoleon und Bayern“ 
 Ingolstadt Neues Schloss, Bayerisches Armeemuseum, 
Paradeplatz 4, 85049 Ingolstadt [Bavaria,Germany] 
30 April to 31. October 2015, every day 9.00 am to 6.00 pm Organisers: 
Haus der Bayerischen Geschichte (www.hdbg.de/napoleon/), Bayerisches Armeemuseum (http://www.armeemuseum.de/de/ausstellungen/sonderausstellungen/62-ausstellungen/sonderausstellungen/beschreibung-sonderausstellung/707-2015-napoleon-ausfuehrlich.html) and the city […]

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Art and Science in Southern Germany: Hidden Gems II

By Andrea M. Gáldy – Southern Germany offers more than skiing holidays and the Oktoberfest, nice though they are. Traces of ancient Celtic and Roman settlements in the former Province of Raetia can still be admired, while during the mediaeval and early modern period the imperial free cities, bishoprics and monastic foundations acted as seats […]

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Cormon’s Cain Flees The Curse

By Patrick Hunt –  Fernand Cormon’s giant 1880 painting almost fills an entire gallery wall at the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, not just because it is almost 23 feet long (7 meters) but also because its dramatic starkness directly strikes the viewer in the often-darkened room. The biblical background of Genesis 4:11-12 is alluded in Carmon’s most […]

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